Best Practices

Best Practices · 05. November 2021
Top FREE resources for Document Controllers
Document Control is a profession where it is important to know the what (tasks), the how (processes & tools), the why (values, ethics, reasons), the who (roles and responsibilities). There is a lot to learn and continuous learning and continuous improvement really differentiates between Document Control professionals and others. There are a lot of free resources out there that you can use to either improve your awareness or improve your skills.
Best Practices · 12. July 2021
Do your users read your weekly statistics & reports?
If you publish a weekly report pertaining to documentation, you have a weekly opportunity to add value to the work of your interfaces and users. If you do not yet produce weekly reports, it is advised to consider introducing this practice. Weekly reports are meant to provide valuable information to their readers, wherever they sit in the organisation chart.
Best Practices · 12. July 2021
Poor DC Causes Damage Only In Hazardous Activity Sectors – True Or False? [Episode 2]
This series tackles the myth that poor Document Control can only cause damages in hazardous activity sectors. Episode 2 takes the example of poor document control impacting a couple selling their apartment.
Best Practices · 31. March 2021
Poor DC Causes Damage Only In Hazardous Activity Sectors – True Or False? [Episode 1]
This series tackles the myth that poor Document Control can only cause damages in hazardous activity sectors. Episode 1 takes the example of a revision control mistake on a quotation.
Best Practices · 31. March 2021
Can there be a "standard" filing structure?
Consepsys is often asked: “Is there a standard for filing structures?” or “Is there a standard filing structure in my industry?” Many Document Control professionals face the daunting question of how to design their filing structure indeed.
Best Practices · 31. March 2021
Are things always "black or white" in Document Control?
We live in a very opinionated world, wherein everyone has their opinion about everything and anything, and wherein opposing views appear to be impossible to reconcile. The world of Document Control is not exempt from this binary stance on matters. For some Document Control professionals, there are the rules on one side, and anything that does not fit on the other side. But, provided that an action complies with the TICCQS values, are things always “black or white”?
Best Practices · 02. October 2020
Can a complex problem be solved with an easy solution?
We live in an era where the truth often struggles to find its way into debates. Complex problems are often over-simplified and therefore, inadequate solutions are proposed, because they are based on an incomplete assessment of reality. So, can a complex problem be solved with an “easy” solution? Or, in other words, can there always be a simple solution to a complex problem?
Best Practices · 02. October 2020
Document Controllers seen by their interfaces
Last year, Consepsys asked various non-DC clients around the world to anonymously give their honest impression of their Document Control colleagues. These clients included Managers, Engineers, Planners, Scientists, Construction Supervisors, Architects and even Aircraft Pilots. We have selected a few anonymous testimonies, and we have split them into two categories: (1) Positive and (2) To be improved.
Best Practices · 02. October 2020
Do you know what "trusting a document" means?
One of the core missions of Document Control is to ensure that users can trust the documents at their disposal. Document Controllers facilitate controlled processes to achieve this objective, such as quality checks, revision control, and facilitation of distributions and reviews – just to name a few. But do you know what “trusting a document” means, in practice?
Best Practices · 02. October 2020
Can an 'As-Built' document be revised?
The majority of Document Controllers (70%) work on projects, and the majority of those projects involve a construction phase. Best practice dictates that documents are revised to reflect what has really been built. As per safe and best practices, at the end of the project, all “Issued for Construction” or “Approved for Construction” documents must be marked up and revised to reflect what has really been built.

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